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How will the failed Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger affect Philadelphia?

It won't, says a Comcast spokesman.

The app-based service plans to onboard around 100 new “shoppers,” or independent contractors, to deliver grocery items around Dover.

Starting this Thursday, some 69,000 households in the Dover area will have access to Instacart, an online shopping platform that pledges to put groceries at your doorstep in as little as an hour. The service, which is available in 275 markets (including Wilmington), was founded in San Francisco in 2012 to simplify ordering fresh produce and other perishables for quick delivery. Instacart's model is similar to Uber, in that members of the community can apply to become independent-contractor drivers (called shoppers) who claim orders to fulfill through a mobile app. In Dover, participating stores include Safeway, ACME, CVS and Petco. The service area includes Smyrna, Camden, Townsend and Middletown. Wondering if you'll be able to get access to the service? These are the ZIP codes now added to Instacart's service area in Delaware: 19901, 19902, 19903, 19904, 19905, 19906, 19934, 19936, 19943, 19946, 19961, 19962, 19979, 19980, 19953, 19964, 19709, 19734, 19938, 19955, 19977, 19730 and 19731. New customers can enter the code HIDOVER to get $20 off an order of $35 or more (plus free delivery) until October 25.

Full disclosure: Comcast is the title sponsor of Philly Tech Week 2015, which is organized by Technical.ly's events team.

Comcast made it official this morning, after news leaked yesterday afternoon: Its proposed merger with Time Warner Cable was not going to happen.
“Today, we move on,” said CEO Brian Roberts in a statement. “Of course, we would have liked to bring our great products to new cities, but we structured this deal so that if the government didn’t agree, we could walk away.”
Comcast spokesman John Demming told Technical.ly Philly the failed deal will not affect the company’s presence in Philadelphia. It won’t affect the development of the company’s second tower, either.
“We’re moving full steam ahead,” Demming said.
Over on Billy Penn, former Comcast exec Frank Eliason (who we interviewed back in 2010offered this take on what Philadelphia was losing from the deal:

When the deal was announced, I had my reservations, but I was thrilled what this could mean for the city of Philadelphia. It would have the potential to bring jobs. It also had the potential to allow this great city to show the world what we are made of, our ingenuity and our spirit. We would have one of the largest companies in America headquartered in the heart of this great city.

In a statement, the Media Mobilizing Project called the news of the failed merger “a breath of fresh air for the poorest big city in the United States,” adding that the group “will now fight for a new Comcast franchise that expands affordable internet, resources for schools and services, workers’ rights, and competition in the hometown we love.”
The man who orchestrated the Time Warner Cable deal, former Comcast CFO Michael Angelakis, will lead a new $4.1 billion investment arm for Comcast, the Inquirer reported earlier this month. Angelakis was also behind the successful merger with NBCUniversal.

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