Diversity & Inclusion
Delaware / Small businesses / Wellness / Youth

Missed the Black Spending Matters marketplace? You can still support its businesses

From beauty to wellness to youth support and beyond, check out these Black-owned ventures in Delaware.

Kenyon O. Wilson (left) and Malcolm Coley of Spending Black Matters (Technical.ly/Holly Quinn)
Black is the new green.

That was the theme of the 3rd annual Spending Black Matters marketplace, which popped up at Eastside Charter on Feb. 24, just in time to help close out another Black History Month.

Every February, Influencers Lab Media, the founder of the Delaware-based, nationally reaching Facebook group of over 33,000 Black business owners and consumers, holds this marketplace in Wilmington. There, local and regional Black-owned businesses can showcase their work and sell their products directly to the community.

The goal, said cofounder Malcolm Coley, is to “recycle the Black dollar” within the community.

This year, for the first time, the event was at EastSide Charter School in Riverside, just across the street from the NERDiT NOW tech recycling center. It drew about 40 businesses, as well as sponsoring community organizations including The Women’s Business Center at True Access Capital, The WRK Group and Wilmington Alliance.

If you missed out, here are a few of the businesses and vendors we saw at the event, with a link to where you can do business with them yourself:

Companies: Wilmington Alliance
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