Startups
Baltimore

Tami Howie stepping down as CEO of Maryland Tech Council

Howie, who led the merger that created MTC, is joining law firm DLA Piper.

Gov. Larry Hogan announces the Maryland Tech Council in January 2017. (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

The Maryland Tech Council said Tuesday that CEO Tami Howie is leaving the organization. Howie, who is a lawyer, is joining law firm DLA Piper as a partner on August 18.
“I have been honored to serve as the CEO of the Maryland Tech Council and to be part of the team that has built it to what it is today,” Howie said in a statement. “I look forward to assisting the state of Maryland achieve its innovation objectives in my new role at DLA Piper.”
In 2015, Howie entered the world of Maryland’s tech trade organizations when she was named CEO of the Chesapeake Regional Tech Council. That organization later merged with the Tech Council of Maryland to form MTC. The move combined organizations with member companies in cyber and life science with a goal boosting visibility for tech around the state and during the legislative session in Annapolis. It now represents 450 member companies and formed a pair of divisions focusing on each area.

Tami Howie.

Tami Howie.


“Under Tami’s leadership, we were able to accomplish several critical objectives, including unification of community constituents, heightened industry and regional visibility, and acceleration of our government relations agenda,” Rene Lavigne, the chair of Maryland Tech Council’s board and CEO of Iron Bow Technologies, said in a statement. “The MTC Board of Directors supports Tami’s decision to return to practicing law.”
A successor wasn’t immediately named. Going forward, the organization’s board plans to assess leadership needs and will “take a comprehensive look at the operational structure and the most appropriate path forward,” according to the MTC statement. Existing staff will remain on.

Companies: Maryland Tech Council

Before you go...

Please consider supporting Technical.ly to keep our independent journalism strong. Unlike most business-focused media outlets, we don’t have a paywall. Instead, we count on your personal and organizational support.

3 ways to support our work:
  • Contribute to the Journalism Fund. Charitable giving ensures our information remains free and accessible for residents to discover workforce programs and entrepreneurship pathways. This includes philanthropic grants and individual tax-deductible donations from readers like you.
  • Use our Preferred Partners. Our directory of vetted providers offers high-quality recommendations for services our readers need, and each referral supports our journalism.
  • Use our services. If you need entrepreneurs and tech leaders to buy your services, are seeking technologists to hire or want more professionals to know about your ecosystem, Technical.ly has the biggest and most engaged audience in the mid-Atlantic. We help companies tell their stories and answer big questions to meet and serve our community.
The journalism fund Preferred partners Our services
Engagement

Join our growing Slack community

Join 5,000 tech professionals and entrepreneurs in our community Slack today!

Trending

As a returning citizen, she experienced tech overload. Now she’s fighting to end the digital divide

How to encourage more healthcare entrepreneurship (and why that matters)

A Baltimore entrepreneur’s new platform aims to topple tech silos

5 innovative tech tools: What to use to get stuff done

Technically Media