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Digital ad giant opens DC office to engage with political clients

The Rubicon Project is solidifying its presence in the political advertising space.

California digital advertising platform Rubicon Project is opening up a D.C. office, just in time to offer its services to lobbyists and political staffers as the election season begins.
The company runs an automated cloud-based online advertising platform — the type of technology more and more campaigns are clamoring for.
“2016 represents a watershed moment for digital advertising as campaigns and advocacy groups seek new and targeted ways to engage, persuade and ultimately turn out voters in the most competitive electoral landscape in recent history,” said the company’s senior VP and head of communications Dallas Lawrence, in a press release Wednesday.
Lawrence — who worked in George W. Bush’s communications department, led the U.S. Department of Education’s congressional outreach branch and held top outreach positions at the Department of Defense and the National Association of Manufacturers in the 2000s — will advise the company’s new politics-focused office.
Theresa Mueller, a former account executive for ad agency Rocket Fuel and PR executive, will direct the office.

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