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Postmates arrives in Baltimore

The app-based delivery service offers more than just food.

A Postmate, the name for Postmates' delivery drivers. (Courtesy photo)

Baltimore just got yet another app-based delivery service. This time, you can order more than food.
Postmates, which launches its Baltimore service on Thursday, employs a fleet of couriers who bring stuff from local establishments to users who order the goods.
The service’s initial delivery zone runs from Inner Harbor, Fells Point and Pigtown north into Towson and Pikesville. Here’s the map they sent over:
postmates
The company’s Baltimore inventory shows a mix of local restaurants and fast food joints. That sounds a lot like OrderUp’s model. But Postmates also offers items like baby supplies, over the counter meds and snacks.
As with other services in the on-demand economy, the connectors between the goods and your impatient, lazy self are couriers, also called Postmates. Spokeswoman Heather Luntz said the company looks to have about 100 local drivers when they launch, and the drivers are mostly folks looking to supplement their income.
“At this time, all Baltimore Postmates are in cars, but we do have bike couriers in other cities — it depends on the size of the zone and the geography of the city,” she said.
Baltimore is one of 10 cities where Postmates is launching on Thursday.
Earlier this week, OrderUp expanded its service to college-centric neighborhoods in Baltimore, and D.C. food delivery service Galley launched here.

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