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Meet the NoLibs firm behind the Police Department’s web presence

It's called Hyaline Creative, and over the past few years, its team has revamped the Police Department's website, built the SafeCam app where Philadelphians can register surveillance cameras and developed the department's text-a-tip line, where tipsters can text police anonymously.

This surveillance camera near Temple University is registered with the city's SafeCam program. Hyaline Creative built the app that lets owners register their cameras. Photo from NPR.

A Northern Liberties web dev firm is behind much of the Philadelphia Police Department‘s evolving web presence.

It’s called Hyaline Creative, and over the past few years, its team has revamped the Police Department’s website, built the SafeCam app where Philadelphians can register surveillance cameras and developed the department’s text-a-tip line, where tipsters can text police anonymously.

It wasn’t your average web project, either: in the last few years, the Police Department has said that social media and other forms of web communication with the public have led to solving crimes.

The Inquirer featured Hyaline’s work on the text-a-tip line here.

Hyaline was founded in 2005 by Drexel alumni Dan Steinberg and Lloyd Emelle, who helps run Code for America‘s Philly civic hacking brigade with Chris Alfano, a fellow Northern Liberties cofounder of web dev firm Jarvus.

Companies: Philadelphia Police Department

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