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Art mash-ups with The Hacktory and NEXUS/foundation gallery

The artists set to hacking, sawing, wrecking, and Frankensteining video games, electronics, kinetics, musical instruments, motion sensors, paintings, computers, circuitry and public spaces.

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On Thursday, NEXUS/foundation for today’s art will partner with The Hacktory to unveil “Unintended Uses,” an exhibition showcasing more than a dozen artists’ art/tech mash-ups. It wasn’t easy. The artists set to hacking, sawing, wrecking, and Frankensteining video games, electronics, kinetics, musical instruments, motion sensors, paintings, computers, circuitry and public spaces.
Our witty, nearly non-sensical preview of the show, along with the where and when‘s, after the jump.

  • Michiel van der Zanden hand paints YouTube clips, three dimensional computer models, and video games to wreck your reality.
  • Don Miller hacks NES cartridges to uniquely market underground music shows, and perhaps more importantly, pay homage to the demoscene programmers of decades past.
  • Reade Vaisman will display his Frankensteined curcuit-bent noise box, complete with messy wiring and all the glitches you’ve come to miss since vacuum tubes burned out.
  • Sarah Muehlbauer makes a fashion statement. Actually, she belts it out like a Greek god. Muehlbauer’s wearable, modernized pan pipe is fashionable, yet functional. Suburban Station commuters will be instantly smittened into donating dollar bills.
  • Kathy Marmor wants you to play with your environment, and with any luck, laugh about it too. But it’s deeper than that, dude. It’s about constructions of identity.
  • Fernando Orellana‘s radio mechanism replicates humankind’s search for the omnipotent by recording signals transmitted by the turn of this General Electric’s dial until it finds a match. This isn’t the first time Radio searched for a God; it’s first lesson in heaven-hunting was when television left the industry for dead.
  • Though it appears to be the long tail, Zachary Stadel‘s sculpture is about tipping points. In his series, he reorganizes the physical construction of a painting from its stretcher bars to its paint to examine presentation in various media.
  • Wil Lindsay‘s ancient monolithic circuit box (read: Commodore) analyzes fingertips like a lie detector and maps psychological make-up. At least, it did until it was abandoned in a building in upstate New York. If Psychological analysis involves only two buttons, count us in.
  • Chris Vecchio is a shoe gazer. Or he was, when he stumbled upon a tiny circuit board sitting in a gutter. He hacked it back together, complete with a speaker. It’s tiny, tinny voice chilled his bones: “You shall perish,” it said. Lucky for Chris, the battery died.

Crane Arts Building
1400 N. American Street

Exhibition runs Thurs., Feb. 12 – Fri. March 6
Wednesday through Sunday 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

[NEXUS/foundation for today’s art in Philadelphia via The Hacktory]

Companies: The Hacktory

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