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Awards / Data / Design / Web development / Women in tech

Here’s who won the 2017 DCFemTech Awards

These 48 women are D.C.'s top engineers, designers and, for the first time this year, data scientists.

DCFemTech Awards winners in 2016. (Photo via Twitter)

DCFemTech, the coalition of women-focused tech groups in the D.C. area, revealed its list of 48 “outstanding” women in web development, design and data science on Wednesday morning. This is the third year for DCFemTech’s annual Awards, and the first time it has included data scientists.

It works like this — DCFemTech puts out a call for nominations and solicits suggestions on who should be recognized at the annual reception. This year, the call for nominations returned 393 submissions representing 169 women, organizers say. The final list is narrowed down by a selection committee, chosen for their “impact on the organization they work for, the complexity of the issue they addressed with code or design or data and their impact on the community, or contributions to the greater women in tech space.”

The awards have only grown since their inception three years ago — in the first year the awards were specified for female developers, but they quickly grew to include designers. This year the data science category was added. “The DCFemTech Awards has become a leading indicator of the strength and quality of women technologists in the DC region,” Shana Glenzer, CMO of MakeOffices and cofounder of DCFemTech, said in a statement. “We received 79 nominations for our inaugural awards. Three years later, nominations increased by more than 200 percent and we even received nominations for women outside of the area.”

Here, in the three recipient categories, are the women doing outstanding work in #dctech:

Engineering

  • Pamela Assogba, Vox Media
  • Aditi Chaudhry, Capital One
  • Lisa Chung, Motley Fool
  • Megan DeLaunay, Capital One
  • Courtney Eimerman-Wallace, Color of Change
  • Rakia Finley, FIN Digital & Surge Assembly
  • Erica Geiser, Social Tables
  • Betsy Haibel, Roostify
  • Anita Hall, The Washington Post
  • Lauren Jacobson, General Assembly
  • Sana Javed, National Journal
  • Veni Kunche, US Geological Survey
  • Leigh Lawhon, TheSELFTaughtDeveloper.com
  • Natassja Linzau, National Academies of Science
  • Laura Lorenz, Industry Dive
  • Emily McAfee, Mapbox
  • Katherine McClintic, LivingSocial/Groupon
  • Tammy Perrin, Attunity
  • Clare Politano, Social Tables
  • Jennifer Safford McGerald, AOL Inc.
  • Rachel Shorey, The New York Times Interactive
  • Liz Theurer, United Income
  • Kristian Tran, Deloitte Digital
  • Pamela Vong, InfernoRed Technology
  • Sabrina Williams, US Digital Service

Design

  • Ashleigh Axios, Automattic
  • Jessica D’Amico, Just Jess & Peers Conference
  • Laura Ellena, Ad Hoc
  • Ngan Hoang, Vox Media
  • Audra Koklys Plummer, Capital One
  • Amy Lee Walton, Mapbox
  • Catherine Madden, Relay by Catherine Madden
  • Hareem Mannan, Excella Consulting
  • Laura McGuigan, Atypical Notion
  • Chloe Negron, Nclud
  • Shelly Ni, Nava PBC
  • Alisha Ramos, Nava PBC
  • Alesha Randolph, Vox Media
  • Liz Rose Chmela, Made by We

Data Science

  • Danielle Beaulieu, Origent Data Sciences
  • Rebecca Bilbro, Bytecubed/District Data Labs
  • Nicole Donnelly, The Office of the Chief Technology Officer, Government of the District of Columbia
  • Laura Drummer, Novetta
  • Kate Rabinowitz, DataLensDC
  • Jennifer Sleeman, Deep Learning Analytics
  • Anna Thorson, National Geographic Partners
  • Angela Wong, The Washington Post
  • Elena Zheleva, National Science Foundation

All the winners will be recognized at a reception at the Washington Post building on May 18.

Companies: DCFemTech

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