Diversity & Inclusion
Robotics / Youth

A statewide youth robotics tournament is coming to Wesley College this Saturday

It's the first time Delaware is hosting a Vex IQ State Championship.

Elementary and middle school students will compete in the Vex IQ State Championship this weekend in Dover, for a chance to qualify for the World Championship in April. (Courtesy photo)

Elementary and middle school students from across the state will meet at Wesley College in Dover for the Vex Robotics Tournament this Saturday, March 11. This will be Delaware’s first ever Vex IQ State Championship.
According to the competition website, the Vex IQ program provides fourth through eighth grade students with the teamwork, critical thinking, project management and communication skills required to prepare them to become the next generation of innovators and problem solvers.
During the competition season, teams, which are made up of four to five students, must build and program a robot in an effort to gain the most points.
Fourteen teams, who qualified for the state championship by winning other local competitions this season, will compete for a chance to attend the World Championship held in Louisville, Ky., this April.
Doors open at 8 a.m and the first match will begin at 9:15 a.m. Get more info here.

Before you go...

Please consider supporting Technical.ly to keep our independent journalism strong. Unlike most business-focused media outlets, we don’t have a paywall. Instead, we count on your personal and organizational support.

Our services Preferred partners The journalism fund
Engagement

Join our growing Slack community

Join 5,000 tech professionals and entrepreneurs in our community Slack today!

Trending

Here’s how the global tech outage impacted many of the vital systems across the mid-Atlantic region

Ready to start marketing your startup? 3 crucial questions all founders should ask

From Big Tech to a big bank, this leader puts innovation at the forefront of her entire career

5 Delaware startups fighting the climate crisis

Technically Media