Diversity & Inclusion

S. Jersey game developer will use Google Glass to help visual impairment

This 26-year-old game developer is blind in his left eye due to an eye disease caused by being born prematurely. He's proposed using Google Glass, Google's wearable computer, to help his visual impairment and was among the 8,000 that Google chose to pilot the technology.

Models of Google Glass. Photo courtesy of the Verge

Dan Fischbach hopes that Google Glass will help him see the world more clearly.

The 26-year-old game developer is blind in his left eye due to an eye disease caused by being born prematurely. Fischbach proposed using Google Glass, Google’s wearable computer, to help his visual impairment and was among the 8,000 that Google chose to pilot the technology.

Dan Fischbach won Google Glass and hopes to use it to help with his visual impairment.

Dan Fischbach won Google Glass and hopes to use it to help with his visual impairment.

Fischbach, who lives in Cherry Hill, N.J. and works part-time at game development company Island Officials, said he’s considering using the technology to help him read small text and with depth perception. He’ll be working with two Colorado-based developers on the project.

Google Glass test users must pay $1,500 for the technology.

Other local Google Glass winners include:

  • Mike Tedeschi, lead UX/UI designer at Azavea, who proposed using Google Glass for crime analysis and forecasting for law enforcement
  • Lloyd Emelle, co-captain of the Code for America Philly brigade
  • Jen Devor, program manager at Campus Philly

Let us know if the comments if you won and give us some details on what you’re going to do with Google Glass.

Companies: Google / Island Officials
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