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CitiStat / Data / Municipal government / OpenBaltimore

CitiStat names Chad Kenney new director, returns to posting reports online

New CitiStat director Chad Kenney is “pledging better transparency and performance from the vaunted good-government program,” reports the Baltimore Sun. The pledge from the new director, who took office in August, comes after a summer where CitiStat failed to meet for almost two months. Since taking over, Kenney has posted five new CitiStat reports to the […]

New CitiStat director Chad Kenney is “pledging better transparency and performance from the vaunted good-government program,” reports the Baltimore Sun.
The pledge from the new director, who took office in August, comes after a summer where CitiStat failed to meet for almost two months. Since taking over, Kenney has posted five new CitiStat reports to the OpenBaltimore website. For nearly two years, according to the Sun, CitiStat failed to post its reports online.

From the report:

Chad Kenney, who was named CitiStat’s director in August after two years as an analyst for the program, has made five reports available on the city’s website, tracking the performance of the departments of transportation and general services. He has also begun holding regular sessions to discuss agencies’ performance. …
In August, the Baltimore Sun noted that not a single report had been posted during Stephanie Rawlings-Blake’s tenure as mayor. When a reporter from the paper attempted to review the reports at City Hall, he was barred from the building. [more]

Established in 1999 during now Governor Martin O’Malley‘s tenure as mayor of Baltimore city, CitiStat keeps tabs on the “performance of general services, water and wastewater, fire, health, housing, police, recreation and parks and transportation agencies,” according to the Sun. Much of that data is culled from 311 requests the city fields, either by phone or online.

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