Civic News
Elections / Municipal government

Rebecca Rhynhart won. Here’s her plan to bring tech into the Controller’s office

The city's former Chief Administrative Officer, who scored the Democratic nomination with backing from the tech scene, won by a landslide last night.

Rebecca Rhynhart, City Controller nominee for the Democratic party. (Courtesy photo)

With a little help from Philly tech scenesters back in May, former Chief Administrative Officer Rebecca Rhynhart scored the Democratic Party’s nomination for the Controller’s Office, unseating incumbent Alan Butkovitz in a move that Philly Mag called a sign of the Democratic machine’s waning power.

But the job wasn’t done for Rhynhart, 43, who served as city treasurer under Mayor Michael Nutter before joining the Kenney administration: she still had to win the thing. And last night, with a whopping 82 percent of the vote, the Democratic beat out Republican nominee Michael Tomlinson and became the first woman to be elected to the Controller’s office.

Our city’s newly elected controller was introduced to the tech scene in May last year, when Chief Data Officer Tim Wisniewski and his team came directly under her watch, in a shakeup that removed a layer of bureaucracy and gave Wisniewski’s team more leeway to work on projects like the city’s website and the release of open data sets.

When she became the Democratic nominee, we asked her how she planned on making tech a part of the oversight office.

“The role of the City Controller is auditing every department every year to root out fraud and increase efficiency,” Rhynhart said. “I plan to look for not just fraud but ways to modernize processes through technology. The ROI could be huge.”

As city controller, Rhynhart promised to push for the digital release of expenditure data.

“What I want to accomplish is very tied into what the tech community feels is important,” said Rhynhart. “That formed the basis of our relationship. My message to them is that I’ll be a strong partner and ally. I will be an advocate for modernization, data, and serve residents in a better way.”

Before you go...

Please consider supporting Technical.ly to keep our independent journalism strong. Unlike most business-focused media outlets, we don’t have a paywall. Instead, we count on your personal and organizational support.

3 ways to support our work:
  • Contribute to the Journalism Fund. Charitable giving ensures our information remains free and accessible for residents to discover workforce programs and entrepreneurship pathways. This includes philanthropic grants and individual tax-deductible donations from readers like you.
  • Use our Preferred Partners. Our directory of vetted providers offers high-quality recommendations for services our readers need, and each referral supports our journalism.
  • Use our services. If you need entrepreneurs and tech leaders to buy your services, are seeking technologists to hire or want more professionals to know about your ecosystem, Technical.ly has the biggest and most engaged audience in the mid-Atlantic. We help companies tell their stories and answer big questions to meet and serve our community.
The journalism fund Preferred partners Our services
Engagement

Join our growing Slack community

Join 5,000 tech professionals and entrepreneurs in our community Slack today!

Trending

Philly startup Burro aims to revolutionize farming with robots

How to encourage more healthcare entrepreneurship (and why that matters)

Wagtail’s Philly event reaches beyond its software, aiming to bring together Python enthusiasts

Find out what type of heat wave you’re really in for with NOAA’s HeatRisk dashboard

Technically Media