Startups

Talk like a developer with these digital flashcards

Hatch Apps created How to Talk Tech, a microsite that reviews basic dev terms.

Hatch team members accept the award for Tech Startup of the Year. (Photo by James Cullum)

For the non-technical folks who frequently find themselves talking to developers, Hatch Apps has a new way to quickly get up to speed on the terminology.

The D.C. startup recently released “How to Talk Tech,” a microsite that provides a guide to the basic glossary of terms in computer science, programming languages and developer tools.

Check it out

Led by Hatch marketing lead Selina McPherson, frontend developer Matt Wojtkun, designer Ramzi Nahawi the site presents the vocabulary in flashcard style, allowing users to either review the words first, or fill in the blanks of definitions.

The need was evident to Wojtkun, who found himself frequently looking up terms as he made the transition to a technology career from communications last year by way of a coding bootcamp at New York Code and Design Academy.

And for a startup with a primary product that looks to make it easier for non-technical folks to launch apps, it’s another way to help bridge the two groups.

“We’re trying to demystify tech and make it tangible to people who don’t code,” Wojtkun said.

Companies: Hatch

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