Startups
POC in Tech / Women in tech

Brazen, a network of female entrepreneurs, launches in Philly

The membership-based organization, which officially launched in Philly Thursday night, looks to set itself apart from other efforts in the space by going industry- and stage-agnostic.

Founder Bonnie Bogle at the launch of Brazen Philly, a networking group for women in tech. (Courtesy photo)

Jennifer Ehlen, the founder of and CEO of membership network Brazen Global was one of many out-of-state guests that came to the city for Philly Tech Week 2018 presented by Comcast — like Backstage Capital’s Arlan Hamilton, who flew in from L.A., or emocha Health’s Katrina Rios, who came in from Baltimore.

Ehlen, who is based in St. Louis, came to support the Philly launch of her network, which looks to support female entrepreneurs and help them grow their businesses. After four years operating in Missouri, in 2018 Brazen expanded to six other U.S. cities like Chicago, Dallas and Detroit.

Locally, the chapter will be run by Bonnie Bogle, a Philly-area native who’s returned to her hometown after starting and running operations at two D.C.-based startups in the tech space: mapping platform Mapbox and tech consulting company Development Seed.

“If I had access to a resource like Brazen, it would have made figuring out how to scale the companies a lot faster,” said Bogle, who’ll be leading the organization’s business strategy and networking offerings. Similar to Delaware’s Great Dames, the group has an initial free tier of membership, with additional services available for monthly fees that range from $10 to $79 a month. The higher tiers include access to “Growth Group Software” and invites to “Brazen Champions Dinners.”

“We’re different than what’s out there in Philly in that we’re industry- and stage-agnostic,” Bogle said in an email. “We don’t just target tech or high growth companies but rather companies before they get to that stage or ones that might never be high growth at all.”

Before you go...

Please consider supporting Technical.ly to keep our independent journalism strong. Unlike most business-focused media outlets, we don’t have a paywall. Instead, we count on your personal and organizational support.

3 ways to support our work:
  • Contribute to the Journalism Fund. Charitable giving ensures our information remains free and accessible for residents to discover workforce programs and entrepreneurship pathways. This includes philanthropic grants and individual tax-deductible donations from readers like you.
  • Use our Preferred Partners. Our directory of vetted providers offers high-quality recommendations for services our readers need, and each referral supports our journalism.
  • Use our services. If you need entrepreneurs and tech leaders to buy your services, are seeking technologists to hire or want more professionals to know about your ecosystem, Technical.ly has the biggest and most engaged audience in the mid-Atlantic. We help companies tell their stories and answer big questions to meet and serve our community.
The journalism fund Preferred partners Our services
Engagement

Join our growing Slack community

Join 5,000 tech professionals and entrepreneurs in our community Slack today!

Trending

How to encourage more healthcare entrepreneurship (and why that matters)

Track power outages with ‘Is PECO Okay,’ a new site from the Philly dev behind ‘Is SEPTA F*cked’

9 inclusivity recommendations for tech workplaces from Philadelphia youth

Welcome to Camp Apple Intelligence

Technically Media