TrainLogic updated significantly to v2.3, now called RailBandit - Technical.ly Philly

Nov. 3, 2009 8:30 am

TrainLogic updated significantly to v2.3, now called RailBandit

RailBandit may look familiar. Since we reported on the original iteration of the mobile train scheduling software in March – called TrainLogic before it changed its name – the Princeton-based team has been hard at work updating the application. RailBandit’s staff has doubled — to two — and they’ve added a bevy of features and support for […]
The RailBandit transit scheduling application appears in a mock-up on a BlackBerry phone.

The RailBandit transit scheduling application appears in a mock-up on a BlackBerry phone.

The RailBandit transit scheduling application appears in a mock-up on a BlackBerry phone.

RailBandit may look familiar.

Since we reported on the original iteration of the mobile train scheduling software in March – called TrainLogic before it changed its name – the Princeton-based team has been hard at work updating the application. RailBandit’s staff has doubled — to two — and they’ve added a bevy of features and support for more devices.

“We’ve added enhancements to the product that has made it take off,” Barry Engle, RailBandit’s new marketing co-founder tells Technically Philly. “We really want to grow this thing.”

RailBandit now features support for U.S. transit lines in more than a dozen cities, including Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Baltimore and San Francisco. Version 2.3 of the transit software dropped in September, with support for most BlackBerry, Nokia, Samsung, Sony Ericsson and LG devices. Windows Mobile support is there with a little customization, if you gotta have it.

Trip planning, which previously could only be arranged 24 hours or fewer in advance, can now be executed up to two weeks ahead of time. The application boasts real-time service updates and delay alerts for a handful of operations, including Philly’s SEPTA, PATCO and NJ Transit lines. Users of the software can easily link to Google Maps of station stops, as well.

Engle says that RailBandit has tripled its number of users in the last four months, when the company first started unveiling its 2.0 features.

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On an aside, the team is keeping an interesting blog following big transit news stories, too, like this fascinating piece about the secret one-minute delay that New York City commuter trains utilize to give commuters an extra 60 seconds to catch trains.

A six-month subscription to RailBandit costs $7.50 for six months. The two-man crew is currently eying expansions to other mobile platforms like Android and Apple’s iPhone OS.

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