Creative

Mar. 25, 2014 12:15 pm

Post Typography: Old Goucher studio highlights 2014 design trends [PHOTOS]

Post Typography is a small design studio in the Old Goucher neighborhood that calls the second floor of a nondescript building home, but its work is anything but bland.

Photo above and slideshow photos courtesy of Post Typography.

Update 3/25/14 12:57 p.m.: Corrected and clarified Post Typography's third design principle. As Strals e-mailed us, Adobe Flash is long gone, but "the new capabilities of the web are similar to when Abobe Flash came out, because there are exciting new possibilities."

Post Typography is a small design studio in the Old Goucher neighborhood that calls the second floor of a nondescript building home, but its work is anything but bland.

The studio’s illustrations have been used by Time on several of the magazine’s covers. A 2011 issue of ESPN The Magazine bears the Post Typography mark. The logo of the popular WYPR radio program Maryland Morning was done by Post Typography. The New York Times has been a consistent client for about seven years. In the redesign of the Washington Post magazine, Post Typography is responsible for as many as eight of the new icons.

Logos, advertising campaigns, websites, posters, illustrations — Post Typography has worked on a variety of each for clients with name recognition. The cover design of the 2010 collaboration album between John Legend and the Roots? That was Post Typography too.

Willen

Bruce Willen.

We really like taking on new projects,” says 33-year-old cofounder Bruce Willen. “We’re almost like a mini-agency: we have the capabilities to work on a lot of diverse elements.”

Since their days in the early 2000s as undergraduates at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Willen and Post Typography cofounder Nolen Strals, 35, have been honing their craft. What first began as an operation of Willen and Strals churning out posters for the Johns Hopkins Film Festival, rock shows, art shows and other local clients has grown into a slightly bigger company.

Strals

Nolen Strals at work.

Now four people work full-time and one works part-time from the studio’s headquarters just north of the Station North Arts and Entertainment District and around the corner from the WYPR studios, where Post Typography has been for four years.

Find more photos of Post Typography’s studio below.

Technical.ly Baltimore stopped by to ask Willen and Strals about design trends to watch out for in 2014. Here’s what they had to say:

  • Illustration is back. In 1997, his freshman year at MICA, Strals switched his major from illustration to fine arts because a professor of his told him illustration was “dead.” That’s not the case now. “There’s been an illustration resurgence in the last 10 years.” Why? Because clip art is terrible.
  • Cheer for HTML5, which Willen and Strals agree give web designers “more possibilities” to be creative.
  • Deeper websites. “The new capabilities of the web are similar to when Adobe Flash came out, because there are exciting new possibilities,” Strals said. Characteristics such as parallax scrolling mean websites can have a three-dimensional feel that makes them more interactive and visually stimulating.

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Andrew Zaleski

Andrew Zaleski is a freelance journalist in Philadelphia and the former lead reporter for Technical.ly Baltimore. Before moving to Philadelphia in June 2014, he was a contributing writer to Baltimore City Paper and a Tech Check commentator for WYPR 88.1 FM, Baltimore city’s National Public Radio affiliate. He has written for The Atlantic, Outside, Richmond magazine, Washington City Paper, Baltimore magazine, Baltimore Style magazine, Next City, Grist.org, The Atlantic Cities, and elsewhere.

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