Uncategorized

G2Link: business to business ranking site goes live, integrates with LinkedIn

Edward Sullivan says his latest venture, G2Link, is meant to help other businesses avoid his mistakes. G2Link, which went live in February, is sort of like an Angie’s List for businesses. The difference, Sullivan says, is that the service is not just geared toward customers, but also other businesses. Any customer, vendor or partner can […]

Edward Sullivan says his latest venture, G2Link, is meant to help other businesses avoid his mistakes.

G2Link, which went live in February, is sort of like an Angie’s List for businesses. The difference, Sullivan says, is that the service is not just geared toward customers, but also other businesses. Any customer, vendor or partner can register on the site to rank, review and evaluate other businesses, so, Sullivan hopes, it is easier to reduce the risk of business deals.

Sullivan says he’s tried to design it so that members can use the site to avoid the bad vendors or unreliable partners that other businesses have learned to avoid the hard way. The site will send alerts for each business a company is tracking, making it possible to keep more accurate tabs on business partners.

“My core idea is that peers know before the financial institutions know,” said Sullivan. “I can put in a list of my partners, vendors and customers and I can see the health of my company. What it does is give you a risk profile.”

Recently, Sullivan announced that G2Link is integrated with LinkedIn, opening up the possibility to create members-only groups to privately share rankings.

Sullivan said the idea for G2Link came about when he learned a hard lesson about using credit checks to evaluate the reliability of a business partner. A company he was working with stopped making payments, and ultimately disbanded in secret and neglected to pay approximately $25,000 owed to Sullivan’s third business, Aria Systems, which employs about 50 people in the Philadelphia area, he says.

Sullivan says the credit checks he ran on the company never raised any red flags.

“The problem with accounting is it’s archaeological,” said Sullivan. “It looks backwards and tells you what happened. It does not look forward and say this company might be at risk. Peers are more of a leading indicator.”

Frustrated by what happened at Aria, Sullivan, 45, approached his son, 25, also named Edward Sullivan, with the idea for G2Link. The younger Sullivan, who graduated from Penn State with a degree in computer science, took the summer of 2009 to help his dad sketch out a plan, the older Sullivan says. The two are still not yet taking a paycheck from the venture.

About 25,000 businesses are being tracked on G2Link, Sullivan told Technically Philly. Now, the goal is to reach one million ratings, Sullivan says.

“Following the path of Yelp, we want to know how to get to a million ratings because we think that will be valuable,” said Sullivan. “That will be our proof point.”

In addition to the two Sullivans, who are based in Drexel Hill, the G2Link team includes freelance developers in Austin and a freelance marketing team in West Chester, Pa. and Miami, Fla. The group is now working on gamification features to allow users to discern the validity of peers and exert reputation control, says Sullivan.

“We use Skype, we use chat and we use other tools that allow us to have a very coherent group that has achieved a lot in the past 90 days,” said Sullivan.”We are trying to build a community of businesses to talk to each other.”

Sullivan says his experience with Aria Systems and other businesses will continue to guide G2Link, creating the peer-based service he wishes he wants to use to inform his own business decisions.

Before you go...

Please consider supporting Technical.ly to keep our independent journalism strong. Unlike most business-focused media outlets, we don’t have a paywall. Instead, we count on your personal and organizational support.

3 ways to support our work:
  • Contribute to the Journalism Fund. Charitable giving ensures our information remains free and accessible for residents to discover workforce programs and entrepreneurship pathways. This includes philanthropic grants and individual tax-deductible donations from readers like you.
  • Use our Preferred Partners. Our directory of vetted providers offers high-quality recommendations for services our readers need, and each referral supports our journalism.
  • Use our services. If you need entrepreneurs and tech leaders to buy your services, are seeking technologists to hire or want more professionals to know about your ecosystem, Technical.ly has the biggest and most engaged audience in the mid-Atlantic. We help companies tell their stories and answer big questions to meet and serve our community.
The journalism fund Preferred partners Our services
Engagement

Join our growing Slack community

Join 5,000 tech professionals and entrepreneurs in our community Slack today!

Trending

Philly startup Burro aims to revolutionize farming with robots

Ghost Robotics is selling a majority stake for $240M, dodging months of protests over military uses

As a returning citizen, she experienced tech overload. Now she’s fighting to end the digital divide

How to encourage more healthcare entrepreneurship (and why that matters)

Technically Media