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5 city IT RFPs, including one for re-issued online lobbying system

After the previous city lobbying system debacle, the city is giving the project another go. In May, Newsworks’ Dave Davies reported that the consulting firm the city had hired to develop an online lobbying database had failed to do so.  According to a recent city RFP [pdf], the city is now looking for another firm to […]

A screenshot of the city’s RFP site. You can only look at RFPs while using Internet Explorer.

After the previous city lobbying system debacle, the city is giving the project another go.

In May, Newsworks’ Dave Davies reported that the consulting firm the city had hired to develop an online lobbying database had failed to do so.  According to a recent city RFP [pdf], the city is now looking for another firm to do the job (h/t Patrick Kerkstra).

What else is the city in the market for? Below, we’ll give a run-down of some live IT city RFPs to show just how many there are.

The city’s contract and RFP site is a wealth of information but it’s not easily accessible — you must use Internet Explorer to access the RFPs themselves, leading some to half-joke that the city needs an RFP for its RFP site. There also seems to be a disconnect between local firms and the city’s  contracting process (though it’s a good sign the city is tweeting out its RFPs): no local firm bid for the city’s 311 app contract.

Out of the 12 open RFPs that are posted on the city’s site, nearly half directly concern technology.

Here’s what else we noticed on the city’s RPF site: City Controller Alan Butkovitz has his sights set on the School District‘s technology, the Sheriff’s Office has made some sort of technology moves (but is still lacking a website) and the city is pushing on with its $120 million project to upgrade its IT. Check out all the RFPs below.

All the contract amounts are to be determined unless specified. All RFP links lead to PDFs.

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