Startups
Environment / Media / Technology

Take a drone’s eye look at Callowhill’s newly-opened Rail Park

Phase 1 of the new public space is now open. Here's why the project is “dear and near” to videographer Cory Popp's heart.

Phase 1 of Callowhill's Rail Park opened Thursday, June 14, 2018. (Video courtesy of Cory Popp)

Before the wooden boardwalk and lounge-style swings transformed a strip of the old Reading Viaduct into the Rail Park, videographer Cory Popp was already a fan of the Callowhill public space.

“I’ve been a frequent explorer of the Rail Park (the viaduct as we called it back then) since 2010 when I fell in love with it after my first visit,” Popp said. “I’ve always had this obsession with finding beautiful places hidden in plain sight and the Rail Park was perfect for that.”

On Thursday, as Phase 1 of the Rail Park officially opened up to the the public, Popp was there — drone and steadycam in hand — to capture the rebirth of the elevated park on a beautiful, sunny day.

“I’ve always loved the contrast between the viaduct with its bright green overgrowth and rusty decaying infrastructure, with the pristine downtown skyscrapers,” Popp said via email. “A little bit of the mystery is gone, but I’m happy that all Philadelphians will get a chance to experience the unique park,”

Here’s the insufferably pretty vid:

The project, slated to span 10 neighborhoods upon completion, has been in the works for eight years. Phase 1, a $10.8-million project designed by Studio Bryan Hanes and Urban Engineers, starts across from the former Philadelphia Inquirer building at Broad and Noble streets, includes the 1300 block of Noble, and runs southeast across 12th and 13th streets to Callowhill Street.

“Every community deserves to have vibrant, public spaces where everyone is welcomed,” said Mayor Jim Kenney at the ribbon cutting ceremony. “This park will not only help anchor Callowhill and the surrounding area, it will also serve as a stimulus for commercial and residential development in the neighborhood”

Before you go...

Please consider supporting Technical.ly to keep our independent journalism strong. Unlike most business-focused media outlets, we don’t have a paywall. Instead, we count on your personal and organizational support.

3 ways to support our work:
  • Contribute to the Journalism Fund. Charitable giving ensures our information remains free and accessible for residents to discover workforce programs and entrepreneurship pathways. This includes philanthropic grants and individual tax-deductible donations from readers like you.
  • Use our Preferred Partners. Our directory of vetted providers offers high-quality recommendations for services our readers need, and each referral supports our journalism.
  • Use our services. If you need entrepreneurs and tech leaders to buy your services, are seeking technologists to hire or want more professionals to know about your ecosystem, Technical.ly has the biggest and most engaged audience in the mid-Atlantic. We help companies tell their stories and answer big questions to meet and serve our community.
The journalism fund Preferred partners Our services
Engagement

Join our growing Slack community

Join 5,000 tech professionals and entrepreneurs in our community Slack today!

Trending

The Trump rally shooter perched on a building owned by American Glass Research. Here’s everything we know about it.

Quantum computing could be the next hot tech — if only that breakthrough would come

Here’s how the global tech outage impacted many of the vital systems across the mid-Atlantic region

Inside Philly City Hall’s new $6.85M lighting system, with hundreds of LEDs that dance with color

Technically Media