Startups

Philadelphia Startup House: 7 bedrooms for entrepreneurs

It's not strictly for tech entrepreneurs: the listing said the space is looking for "individuals who are creating awesomeness in the city via design, business, civic engagement, film, culinary arts, events, crafts, programing, etc."

Brewerytown's "Philadelphia Startup House" is looking for entrepreneurs to fill its seven rooms.

Updated 10/8/13 11:35 a.m.: A previous version of this article stated that Indy Hall's cohousing project K'House had not seen any movement since January 2012. In fact, the project received its building permits late last month.

Wanna live with a bunch of entrepreneurs?

Inspired by West Coast cohousing outfits like Startup Basecamp and Collaborative Housing, a shared space in Brewerytown called Philadelphia Startup House is now on the search for entrepreneurs to fill its seven bedrooms, according to a Craigslist post.

It’s not strictly for tech entrepreneurs: the listing said the space is looking for “individuals who are creating awesomeness in the city via design, business, civic engagement, film, culinary arts, events, crafts, programing, etc.”

Check out photos here.

According to this tweet, the Startup House is run by Martin Montero, who previously worked with Port Richmond manufacturing space The Loom and 3rd Ward coworking space now called Impact Hub Philly. Montero did not immediately respond to a request for comment. In October 2012, Flying Kite reported on a similar venture of Montero’s called Twenty Nineteen LLC.

To be true, at this stage, the entrepreneur angle seems to just be marketing to help fill a rental in a gentrifying Philadelphia neighborhood, but it’s worthwhile that this is seen as a way to generate interest.

In contrast, last June, the aborted Startup Beach House was canceled after the attention surrounding it spooked the landlord.

As for other Philly cohousing projects, Indy Hall’s K’House hasn’t appeared to have made any movement since January 2012  recently received its building permits a few years after the plan was originally announced in spring 2011, and Oxford Mills, the Kensington space billed as affordable housing for teachers, aims to open in late summer 2014.  Both these spaces seem to be larger productions than Philadelphia Startup House, as they’re run real estate development firms and involve building an actual house.

Advertisement

-30-
Subscribe to our Newsletters
Technically Media
Connect with companies from the Technical.ly community
New call-to-action

Advertisement