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MD Love Project: STEM Engine students create website for sharing photos, tweets of MD pride

Photo tweeted by MarylandArts. Students in Digital Harbor Foundation‘s STEM Engine program spent seven hours building a website for the just-launched Maryland LOVE Project, a collaborative effort of the governor’s office, the Maryland State Arts Council and the Baltimore LOVE Project. The website is a holding place for images uploaded directly or tweeted out with […]

Photo tweeted by MarylandArts.
Students in Digital Harbor Foundation‘s STEM Engine program spent seven hours building a website for the just-launched Maryland LOVE Project, a collaborative effort of the governor’s office, the Maryland State Arts Council and the Baltimore LOVE Project.

The website is a holding place for images uploaded directly or tweeted out with the hashtag #MDLove. In early summer, an artist will use the photos as inspiration for painting her own mural in the same vein that Michael Owen, artist of the Baltimore LOVE Project, paints murals of hands spelling the word “love” throughout walls in Baltimore city.
Visit the Maryland LOVE Project site.
As Technically Baltimore reported in November, STEM Engine is a workforce development program run by the Digital Harbor Foundation out of its Federal Hill-based Digital Harbor Tech Center. Through the program, high school students are paid to do website development and design work for clients, and money earned goes toward scholarship funds students can use to pay for college, among other things.

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