Startups

At 16, Felicite Moorman was a precocious lil movie theater manager

StratIS and BuLogics CEO Felicite Moorman ran marketing, payroll and taxes as a teen in her hometown of Edmond, Okla.

Felicite Moorman back in the day. (Courtesy photo)

Picture this: a sixteen-year-old Felicite Moorman, the CEO of BuLogics and StratIS, pitching her boss at a college-town movie theater on why she deserves to be the manager.

“Turnover is fast in a second-run theatre,” Moorman recalls. “So by the time summer ended, I’d worked there full-time for nearly six months and had seniority.”

It was a bustling business, the East Falls resident recalls. But she jumped at the chance to have more experience: at her new role, she tackled scheduling, training, payroll, taxes and inventory.

“I moved out of my parents house that year and moved in with a coworker,” the CEO remembers. “My portion of the rent was $112.50 a month (!) and at the time I was doing concurrent enrollment in college, limiting my tedious hours in high school to two a day.”

Back then, in her hometown of Edmond, Okla., Moorman said she learned the lesson of a lifetime.

“Work can be one of the best things in your world,” Moorman said. “To resent sleep because it deprives you of the hours you could be spending on your real-life dream is a rare and awesome thing. It’s no surprise that life brings me back, full-circle, to run BuLogics and StratIS in what was, at one time, a movie theatre. And yes, we have a fully-functional popcorn machine. And I resent the hell out of sleep.”

Companies: STRATIS IoT / BuLogics

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