Startups
Startups

You can buy shares of NYC’s 3 World Trade Center via DC crowdfunding platform Fundrise [Startup Roundup]

Plus: An Arlington-based Amazon for Bitcoin users raised $433,000.

What New York's 3 World Trade Center will look like. Through Fundrise, shares of the building cost $5,000 each. (Photo courtesy of Silverstein Properties)

WHO’S GETTING FUNDED?

Araxid Prime, the McLean-based maker of a software that helps connect separate databases, has raised a $12.5 million Series A fund, according to a release. The company will use the money to expand its healthcare-focused technology to other industries like retail, telecom and finance.
Regenxbio, a D.C.-based biotech firm focused on gene therapy, closed a $30 million Series C round, according to a release.
Destination Unknown, an as yet-unknown Chinatown club to be located at at 915 F Street NW, according to Clubplanet.com, is trying to borrow $1.3 million, according to an SEC filing.
The Bitcoin Shop, the Arlington-based Amazon for Bitcoin users, raised $433,000, according to an SEC filing.
Gravatate, a Reston-based cloud platform that facilitates community collaboration, raised $65,000, according to an SEC filing.

WHO’S MAKING MOVES?

Fundrise, a real estate crowdfunding platform based in D.C., is selling shares (minimum $5,000) of the 3 World Trade Center. The tax-exempt bonds will help fund the construction project at Ground Zero, according to an SEC filing.
Create, the app that allows users to zigzag around a map of D.C. and zoom in on properties to learn about their real estate stats, has already attracted more than 1,000 sign-ups since it launched a couple weeks ago. If you’re one of them, sign up for their “Intro to Create” webinar on Thursday from 2:00-3:00 p.m.
Grotech Ventures, the Vienna-based VC firm, has co-led a $3.9 million investment round for Dizzion, a virtual desktop company based in Colorado, according to a release.
As we all sat down during the State of the Union to play drinking games and dissect the facial expressions of John Boehner and Joe Biden, Travis Valentine was working on his app, DialTest, which allows event planners to monitor the mood of their public in real time. Here’s how different segments of the public, including Democrats, Republicans and simple partiers, reacted to President Obama’s yearly speech.

HOW’S D.C. DOING?

Not too bad, according to the Forbes list of America’s Most Promising Companies, which lists Arlington-based
Evolent Health at #12; Reliant Asset Management, also based in Arlington, at #14; and Chevy Chase-based WeddingWire at #60.

Companies: Regenxbio / Fundrise / WeddingWire / Create / Grotech Ventures

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