Professional Development
Cybersecurity / Federal government / Jobs / Workplace culture

A new Cybrary partnership plans to add 600 apprenticeships in cybersecurity

Through work with Safal Partners and the Cyber Future Foundation, the College Park-based company is offering cybersecurity training to U.S. Department of Labor apprentices.

Cybrary's HQ in College Park's Discovery District. (Courtesy photo)

Cybersecurity-focused workforce development platform Cybrary is continuing to grow its educational support for professionals. The College Park, Maryland-based company has a new joint partnership launching today with Safal Partners and Cyber Future Foundation (CFF) to provide cybersecurity training for U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) apprentices.

The program will provide employers with cybersecurity and technology training programs for public and private sector apprentice employees, with plans to add 600 apprenticeships in the first year and 750 annually over the next five years. It builds on an existing contract between Safal and the CFF’s Department of Labor arm to increase the overall number of cybersecurity apprenticeships available.

“Cybersecurity can often be overlooked when it comes to education, so this partnership is a step in the right direction to increase the awareness and importance of it within a major federal agency like the USDOL,” said Valmiki Mukherjee, founder of CFF.

Program participants will be able to access 200 cybersecurity learning modules, plus workshops, labs and on-demand training as selected by the employer. The apprenticeships are full-time, with the location based on the participating employers and both virtual and in-person offerings. The overall goal is to equip additional employees with cybersecurity skills, which a recent Enterprise Strategy Group study said 70% of companies are lacking.

“These positions are the backbone of any strong security team and we’re looking forward to seeing how this collaboration helps enable more teams to scale their collective skillsets,” said Wesley Samuel III, senior VP at Cybrary.

The partnership is the latest in Cybrary’s offerings to boost cybersecurity education. Last June, it offered seven free courses in cybersecurity and IT training for professionals impacted by the pandemic, following it up with another round in November featuring disinformation and preparing for cyber attacks. At the time, the company said that learning hours quarter over quarter had increased by 2.5x, but enrollment in the courses offered monthly increased 30-fold.

Check out the apprenticeship program here
Companies: Cybrary

Before you go...

Please consider supporting Technical.ly to keep our independent journalism strong. Unlike most business-focused media outlets, we don’t have a paywall. Instead, we count on your personal and organizational support.

3 ways to support our work:
  • Contribute to the Journalism Fund. Charitable giving ensures our information remains free and accessible for residents to discover workforce programs and entrepreneurship pathways. This includes philanthropic grants and individual tax-deductible donations from readers like you.
  • Use our Preferred Partners. Our directory of vetted providers offers high-quality recommendations for services our readers need, and each referral supports our journalism.
  • Use our services. If you need entrepreneurs and tech leaders to buy your services, are seeking technologists to hire or want more professionals to know about your ecosystem, Technical.ly has the biggest and most engaged audience in the mid-Atlantic. We help companies tell their stories and answer big questions to meet and serve our community.
The journalism fund Preferred partners Our services
Engagement

Join our growing Slack community

Join 5,000 tech professionals and entrepreneurs in our community Slack today!

Trending

Howard University’s Black Commerce Conference doubles in size for its return on Juneteenth

Welcome to Camp Apple Intelligence

Find out what type of heat wave you’re really in for with NOAA’s HeatRisk dashboard

How AI can revolutionize education's quest for truth

Technically Media