Our fave youth STEM projects from the After-School All-Stars' Innovator's Fair - Technical.ly Philly

Dev

Apr. 3, 2017 11:10 am

Our fave youth STEM projects from the After-School All-Stars’ Innovator’s Fair

“It's very funny and sometimes cool,” said 12-year-old Jihad Carter of his rotating robot.

Beep boop swoosh.

(GIF via Giphy.com)

Gosh, is there anything more hope-restoring than watching lil kids work on STEM projects?

Fortunately, at After-School All-Stars Philadelphia’s first Innovator’s Fair last Friday, this reporter happily witnessed how 20 kids from William D. Kelley, Vare-Washington and Conwell Middle Magnet schools built and showcased some impressive projects, developed alongside volunteer advisors.

Reynelle Staley, the nonprofit’s executive director, had a beaming smile as she greeted attendees to the fair, which took place at the fancy CIMCity Lounge on the 15th floor of the Comcast Center.

“We try try to have students learn about new technologies and develop a passion but also see that there are real world uses to what they learn,” Staley said. “Connecting to technology means they can do anything.”

But it’s all about the kids, so let’s get straight to the projects, shall we? Here are some of our favorites.

Sphero

12-year-old Jihad Carter from William D. Kelley says his favorite thing about the Sphero robots project is learning to control them through the iPad. He was happy to demo the spinning droid to everyone who asked.

“It’s very funny and sometimes cool,” said Carter.

EdDigger

Justin, also from Vare-Washington in South Philly, shows off the EdDigger robot, built from Edison’s educational robots. It can be programmed to travel, stop and “dig” as needed.

Robot Wars

Two Edison programmable robots try and kick each other off a mat in a death match-style battle. As with any robotics project, the important lesson for the kids happens behind those two laptops, where an easy coding interface tells the robots what to do.

Granted, it’s not always a thrilling face-off, but here are the robots in action:

EdPrinter

Emanuel and Luis were very shy at first, but they can talk all day about the LEGO-made OG printer they built.

As they got to the expo, the duo had to overcome a few technical difficulties and do some fixes on the fly to their project. Mind you, this isn’t so much a printer as a “tracer,” but the key lesson behind this project, as with all of the others, is getting machines to follow instructions through coding.

Racing Game

Using an MIT-built coding education platform called Scratch, students from the Vare-Washington School built a cool racing game, with guidance from After School All-Stars instructors.

Full disclosure: This reporter played a match of Racing Game for educational purposes, of course. He lost spectacularly.

I’ll get you next time, José.

Companies: Comcast
-30-
JOIN THE COMMUNITY, BECOME A MEMBER
Already a member? Sign in here

Advertisement

If elected, this 26-year-old scientist could bring a STEM voice to City Council

South Philly agtech startup Augean Robotics raises $1.5M

Here’s a roadmap for increasing access to computer science

SPONSORED

Philly

This startup is striving to deliver the future of freight

Philadelphia

Perpay

UX Designer

Apply Now
Philadelphia, PA - Center City

Odessa

Pre-Sales Business Analyst

Apply Now
Horsham, PA

Penn Mutual

Software Engineer

Apply Now

Help this Philly nonprofit set the world record of girls coding

A Northeast Philly student’s science experiment will be performed in outer space

Why yes, girls in low-tech households are still interested in STEM

SPONSORED

Philly

Why Deacom’s team prioritizes collaboration and continuous improvement

Horsham, PA

Penn Mutual

Software Engineer-Java

Apply Now
Horsham, PA

Penn Mutual

Product Systems Trainer-LEAP

Apply Now
Horsham, PA

Penn Mutual

Communications Specialist

Apply Now

Sign-up for daily news updates from Technical.ly Philadelphia

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!