This graph shows how Netflix speeds changed after Comcast deal [Comcast Roundup] - Technical.ly Philly

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May 9, 2014 7:30 am

This graph shows how Netflix speeds changed after Comcast deal [Comcast Roundup]

“Since Netflix gave into Comcast’s demands for payment in exchange for a promise to deliver movies smoothly over the Internet to Netflix’s customers, speeds on Comcast for Netflix users have rocketed upward,” the Washington Post reports.
  • Comcast to face merger questions from House panel [Philadelphia Inquirer] “Former U.S. Justice Department antitrust attorney Allen P. Grunes is scheduled to testify and said on Wednesday that government regulators could view the proposed mega-merger as anti-competitive and bring litigation to stop it. One concern for the Justice Department attorneys, he said, would be that Comcast returns to the Washington regulators in two or three years with another acquisition of a cable-TV company.”
  • This hilarious graph of Netflix speeds shows the importance of net neutrality [Washington Post] “Since Netflix gave into Comcast’s demands for payment in exchange for a promise to deliver movies smoothly over the Internet to Netflix’s customers, speeds on Comcast for Netflix users have rocketed upward. Speeds on the larger service providers have been decreasing steadily since last fall, but following the deal, Comcast restored all the speed that Netflix had lost and much more in the space of a couple of months. Netflix might also have to pay Verizon and AT&T a similar fee to ensure that its customers enjoy reasonable speeds when they are watching films.”

    % change in Netflix download speed since Jan. 2013, by I.S.P.

    % change in Netflix download speed since Jan. 2013, by I.S.P.

  • Comcast CEO Neil Smit Says Improving Customer Service Is His Top Priority [TechCrunch]
  • As Netflix Resists, Most Firms Just Try to Befriend Comcast [New York Times] “Virtually every media and tech company — content providers like CBS and Disney, video streaming services like Amazon, Netflix and YouTube, and social media and e-commerce sites — has a major stake in the outcome of the government’s review of the merger. The question these companies now face is whether their interests are better served by speaking out about it, or by keeping any possible complaints to themselves as they try to negotiate the best deals they can with Comcast. For the time being, almost none are publicly speaking out, partly because they are wary of antagonizing a company with which they do business.”

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Organizations: Comcast, Netflix
People: Neil Smit
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VIEW COMMENTS
  • Benjamin

    “This hilarious graph of Netflix speeds shows the importance of net neutrality”

    On the contrary, it shows how real commerce works. What is not shown here is the facts:
    – Netflix was increasing it’s high speed streaming services over it’s standard streaming.
    – Netflix was increasing it’s customer base.
    – Comcast was in the process of upgrading their capacity and was getting many local governments to allow them to dig up old cables so they can lay new ones.
    – Netflix comprised 33% of all traffic, but only they and a few other video streamers required the upgrade.
    – The price of high speed subscriptions on Netflix increased from $7 to $8 per month.
    – The upgrades increased the speeds of all other services Comcast offered, while prices stayed the same or decreased.

    Seems to me, the luxury of watching movies in high quality paid for people getting cheaper news and email services.

    • Steve

      That’s great until Comcast decides that “XFinity Streaming On-Demand!” is the only streaming service that people really need, and that all others are simply luxuries that can be throttled to death. Maybe Comcast–which owns NBC–could decide that other news outlets that compete with it’s own are luxuries as well, and throttle them to uselessness. MSNBC is all you really need for news, right?

      That’s fine though, if they do that, customers will just switch to another provider. It’s a good thing that Comcast doesn’t have a functional monopoly in a large number of major markets. If all else fails, people can simply do without the internet, because that’s a pretty easy thing to do in 2017.

      It’s not about the numbers, it’s about giving a small number of companies the ability to choose winners and losers in the marketplace.

      • Benjamin

        Yes, that’s all possible. Just like it’s possible that the government doesn’t like you saying bad things about a certain group of people or a President. Or make an innocent joke. Or state a fact that they don’t agree with. Then your as good as in Scotland where a Tweet is worth jail time or as in Canada where a simple comment of facts can get you fined.

        See, if you want to play “what if”, you have to play the real way… with actual examples that happen, and use both sides.

        But to your examples, If NBC/Universal/Comcast chooses to block Fox or Netflix or whatever, you can a;ways drop them and go with Verizon/Yahoo. Or use a Roku where they can’t block a specific channel.

        Or you can realize that Comcast uses the government to keep competition out of your city and demand your politicians fix that or loose their job. Or you can demand government shrink so small that they can’t prevent competition in your area.

        An, well, if X-Finity streaming on demand is the only website they let through (like your electric company not letting you get electricity from coal), you have radio for news and you have movie theaters and the real world for entertainment.

        Again, I see where you are coming from, but going to the wolf and asking them to make certain the mountain lion doesn’t eat your chickens is a kinda odd way to go. You still end up losing chickens.

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