Techweek arrives in DC for the first time - Technical.ly DC

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Oct. 2, 2017 8:06 am

Techweek arrives in DC for the first time

The Oct. 2-6 series of events has insights for young companies, demos of emerging technology and a hiring fest.

Techweek CEO Amanda Signorelli.

Photo provided by Olivia Tarleton, Motion PR.

Techweek, a company dedicated to bringing conferences to major cities  across the United States in order to inspire the growth of sustainable businesses, is collaborating with AARP to bring its five day conference to DC for the first time. The conference will take place this week, Oct, 2-6. The schedule has nearly 30 events.

“We design our conferences around our mission, with a focus on bringing together the right people to discuss the right content to foster growth in the tech ecosystem. Our belief is that over the next 50 years, growth will come from tech companies, and those companies should not be exclusively in Silicon Valley but throughout North America,” said Amanda Signorelli, CEO of Techweek.

The week will start off on Monday evening with a kick off party, which will also feature a DolphinTank, for entrepreneurs. On Tuesday evening AARP will host Disrupt D.C.: Hatchery at AARP Innovation to showcase various startups. On Wednesday at 5 p.m., another startup-centric event will offer business owners the opportunity to talk about their experience through panels and to network. The event will continue on Thursday with a morning presentation on blockchain technology. On Friday Techweek will present three events in the Newseum, including a Women in Tech Breakfast, a growth summit followed by individual talks and panels by CEOs, and  a hiring fair at noon.

Techweek already holds regular events in eight other cities, Detroit, Chicago, Toronto, Kansas City, New York, Dallas, Los Angeles and Miami. According to Signorelli, Washington D.C. seemed a natural next place to hold the event because. “D.C.’s flourishing tech ecosystem, paired with its prominent government research and scientific institutions make this the ideal new market for us,” she said in a statement. “The U.S. capital is the heart of where national tech regulations are created and it is the life blood of how startups across country ultimately evolve.”

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Grace Ballenger

Grace Ballenger is a recent graduate from Wellesley College who has written for Slate and The Tempest. She enjoys writing about technology, language and culture.

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