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City cops must determine how video evidence will affect policing [AUDIO]

The Philly cop who was filmed punching a woman and was recently acquitted, reveal the city's shortcomings when it comes to how video evidence affects policing and the criminal justice system, said a Temple prof.

Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University Jerry Ratcliffe (background) and civil rights attorney David Rudovsky speak with host Marty Moss-Coane. Photo credit: Radio Times.

The events surrounding Lt. Jonathan Josey, the cop who was filmed punching a woman and was recently acquitted, reveal the city’s shortcomings when it comes to how video evidence affects policing and the criminal justice system, said Jerry Ratcliffe, chair of Temple University‘s Criminal Justice Department, on a recent episode of WHYY‘s Radio Times.

“We’re lagging behind the technology in our [policing, judiciary] systems,” Ratcliffe said.

The show, which also featured civil rights attorney David Rudovsky and technology reporter Timothy Lee, focused on the effect of video surveillance on the relationship between city government and the public. Listen to the whole show here or below.

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Also check out our recent coverage of how 90 percent of the cameras the police use belong to SEPTA.

Companies: Temple University / WHYY
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