Suneris cofounder named TED Fellow as medical company opens new space - Technical.ly Brooklyn

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Jul. 31, 2014 8:29 am

Suneris cofounder named TED Fellow as medical company opens new space

Joe Landolina, the 21-year-old CEO of Suneris, recently earned a spot at the prestigious TEDGlobal conference. He also announced the sizable expansion of his Brooklyn-based company.

Joe Landolina speaking at TEDxCibeles.

(Screenshot via YouTube)

Joe Landolina was recently named to the 20-person TEDGlobal Fellows class of 2014.

The 21-year-old entrepreneur invented Veti-Gel while still in college at NYU. We previously covered his company, Suneris, which he cofounded with Isaac Miller, in October. It’s a gel that can be applied to a bleeding wound and instantly stop the bleeding and trigger the body to begin healing.

It’s a breakthrough in acute care but the team also believes it could be disruptive in terms of personalized medicine. He’ll say more about his technology when he speaks at TEDGlobal 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, in October.

The company has made a lot of progress, as a business, since we last covered it. “We just opened a new, 2,500-square-foot Suneris facility, with labs, a manufacturing plant, and offices,” Landolina said in a statement. “We’ve now got 10 employees.” Technical.ly Brooklyn is following up to find out more about this new facility.

Listen to Landolina explain how his Veti-Gel works — by imitating the body’s extracellular matrix, something he calls an adaptive response to an injury — in his talk at TEDxCibeles:

Companies: Suneris
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