Robots, clothes and pizza: A sampling of the makers gathered at Garage Fest - Technical.ly Baltimore

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Oct. 2, 2017 10:02 am

Robots, clothes and pizza: A sampling of the makers gathered at Garage Fest

The Sept. 30 festival in and around The Foundery in Port Covington showed what Baltimore is creating. We've got photos.
Inside the tent at Garage Fest.

Inside the tent at Garage Fest.

(Photo by Brian James Kirk)

Makers come from many different backgrounds, so it was fitting that there was a big tent outside City Garage on Saturday.

Barely two days after Betamore hosted a big party for the tech and innovation community at Beta City, the tent was transformed to become the home of Garage Fest. The family-friendly event brought together a cross-section of makers from around the city, and also offered a look inside activities inside The Foundery makerspace, which opened last year.

Port Covington played host to urban farmers, light manufacturers, robots and plenty of takes on food. As suggested by the large robot battleground set up by the Baltimore Robotics Center which greeted many who entered, Baltimore’s tech community was well-represented. Drone outfits Elevated Element and Global Air Media, as well as Harbor Designs and Manufacturing and Baltimore Node’s Todd Blatt were all showing off their latest work.

The younger generation also had a voice. Education-focused orgs like Digital Harbor Foundation, sent their 3D print shop team, and Code in the Schools showed off the latest work with Bad Batch.

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B360 and FutureMakers gave kids who arrived plenty of activities, as well.

Digital Harbor Foundation's 3D Print Shop team. (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Digital Harbor Foundation’s 3D Print Shop team. (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Robots battled it out (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Robots battled it out (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Here’s a look at a handful of ventures we encountered for the first time:

Kelvin Jordan of 16Sixteen. (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Kelvin Jordan of 16Sixteen. (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Along with tech, Baltimore’s burgeoning clothing lines were well-represented throughout. With a tape measure around his neck and sitting behind a machine, Kelvin Jordan pointed out some of the latest line for 16Sixteen, which makes jackets, hats and other items. The imprint is the kind of smaller boutique labels that may be more popular in New York, but isn’t found as much in smaller markets like Baltimore and Jacksonville, Fla., where Jordan’s cofounder is based.

“We stand out because we’re a little different than what everybody else is doing,” he said. 16Sixteen also works with other art and fashion ventures like SewLab USA and Hazell A.R.T and also works with local artists.

Bobby Bassett of Rack House Bakers. (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Bobby Bassett of Rack House Bakers. (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

The Foundery’s influence in helping provide tools for businesses was felt throughout. It even extended to food. Just outside the entrance, we met Bobby Bassett. The entrepreneur introduced us to Rack House Bakers. The company makes a whiskey cake using Sagamore Spirit, which is the rye whiskey made across Port Covington at a distillery backed by Plank Industries. Bassett is also a member of the Foundery, and is using the tools inside to help merchandise the product.

The Foundery's Corey Fleischer served up Tiny Brick Oven pizzas.

The Foundery’s Corey Fleischer served up Tiny Brick Oven pizzas.

Inside the building, there was more food to be had. Will Fagg was making pizzas to be cooked in the Tiny Brick Oven he created. From a distance, the oven looks like a Weber grill. However, the pizza is cooked on a rotating surface reached only through the side of the grill. And Fagg said the pizza is cooked at 900 degrees. He’s also a member of The Foundery, and screenprinting and logos for the company at the space.

For a sweet treat, the makerspace also brought back a favorite with liquid nitrogen ice cream.(Photo by Brian James Kirk)

For a sweet treat, the makerspace also made ice cream using liquid nitrogen ice cream. (Photo by Brian James Kirk)

LaShauna Jones and Daejonne Bennett (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

LaShauna Jones and Daejonne Bennett (Photo by Stephen Babcock)

Elsewhere in eats, LaShauna Jones and Daejonne Bennett were serving hot dogs made with plenty of local ingredients at The Sporty Dog. They were offering beef and vegetarian hot dogs, with a full menu of toppings. Showing that entrepreneurs aren’t limited to one venture, we previously talked to Jones in her role with Greenmount West neighborhood.

 

Companies: Baltimore Foundery
Projects: City Garage
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