Baltimore Data Day is looking to the neighborhoods - Technical.ly Baltimore

Civic

Jul. 10, 2017 10:25 am

Baltimore Data Day is looking to the neighborhoods

The daylong event on July 14 is featuring community association leaders, as well as #opendata leaders.

A workshop at Baltimore Data Day 2015.

(Photo by Stephen Babcock)

The Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance provides data on Baltimore communities with its annual Vital Signs report.

So it’s fitting that the University of Baltimore-based program is putting the focus on neighborhoods for an event that looks to provide a way for leaders and community to dig into #opendata.

Baltimore Data Day, which is set to be held Friday, July 14, at the University of Baltimore’s Thumel Business Center, features a daylong series of workshops and panel discussions from organizations using data to help the city.

Register

The morning introductory session will feature community associations, including the Gwynns Falls Neighborhood Association and Heritage Crossing Resident Association.

The event looks to provide insight on tools and strategies for using data. As such, morning sessions seek to lay out what’s available in Baltimore, as well as demystify where data comes from. Leaders from the city and Baltimore Police Department will be onhand. One workshop will also provide an intro to Geoloom, a cultural mapping tool.

There’s also a focus on applying data to specific issues. A morning session will look at transportation data in Maryland, while afternoon panels focus on health, housing and social justice.¬†Find the agenda here.

 

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Stephen Babcock

Stephen Babcock is Market Editor for Technical.ly Baltimore and Technical.ly DC. A graduate of Northeastern University, he moved to Baltimore following stints in New Orleans and Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Baltimore Fishbowl, NOLA Defender, NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune and the Rio Grande Sun.

  • Mike Engler

    Why is there no discussion of small business; which seems to be routinely ignored by Baltimore City except when they want more money and expect us to hire more? Vibrant small businesses are an integral part of any community.

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