Cwist changes name to Workbench - Technical.ly Baltimore

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Jul. 14, 2016 12:47 pm

Cwist changes name to Workbench

The maker-education platform is also working with companies on drones and electronics lessons.

Outside City Garage.

(Photo by Stephen Babcock)

As it expands, Cwist is changing its name. The edtech company is now called Workbench, reflecting the edtech platform that it offers for makers.

CEO Chris Sleat said the rebrand is designed to provide clarity around the platform, which houses online communities around project-based learning. While Cwist had some “brand equity,” Sleat said the new name offers a “great way to help us focus on what we’re doing with our customers.”

The City Garage-based startup runs online communities for companies that want to expand education offerings. Students and teachers can access content provided by the companies, and interact around maker projects. The new name reflects the idea that the content offered is a “workbench” of maker tools.

“We’re taking some leaders in the categories, and they’re standardizing on our platforms,” Sleat said.

The company has five partners currently launched on the platform such as robotics company Sphero (think BB-8 from Star Wars). A pair of new partners recently signed on.

  • Paris-based Parrot is offering a variety of drone and robotics lessons through the Parrot Education Community platform.
  • With SparkFun, Workbench built an offering called InventorSpace that’s based around electronics.

Another four companies are in the pipeline, with more expected by the end of the year. While there has been a lot of interest, Sleat said he wants to make sure the nine-member team is focused on servicing those existing customers.

“That’ll give us the bump to grow on reputation and quality,” he said.

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Stephen Babcock

Stephen Babcock is the lead reporter for Technical.ly Baltimore. A graduate of Northeastern University, he moved to Baltimore following a stint in New Orleans, where he served as managing editor of online news and culture publication NOLA Defender. While there, he also wrote for NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune. He was previously a reporter for the Rio Grande Sun of Northern New Mexico.

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