Planit rethinks itself in move to Locust Point - Technical.ly Baltimore

Business

Jun. 7, 2016 12:39 pm

Planit rethinks itself in move to Locust Point

From ditching orange to opening a community-minded cafe, the creative agency has given a lot of thought to the everyday influence of its new space. We got a tour.

The new Planit office along Key Highway in Locust Point.

(Photo by LeAnne Matlach)

Instead of moving on up, Planit Agency is now on the ground floor. But the mood at the digital agency has never been higher.

“It’s really important because, with all due respect to the building and environment we were in before, we were sort of the outsiders,” said Planit cofounder Matt Doud of the agency’s old office in an Inner Harbor high-rise. “There were a lot of commercial real estate people, attorneys and brokers, and it just wasn’t our brand. It was a beautiful place and it attracted a lot of great employees and clients but it just wasn’t our culture.”

Planit founders Matt Doud and Ed Callahan in the company's new Locust Point offices.

Planit founders Matt Doud and Ed Callahan in the company’s new Locust Point offices. (Photo by LeAnne Matlach)

To help build an office and culture that fit the agency, the company grew its space by 150 percent. And the office building on Key Highway is proudly emblazoned with a green Planit sign and logo. The company shed its signature orange — featured in renderings from August 2015 — during the move across the harbor in May.

Advertisement

But Doud said the move wasn’t just about getting bigger; it’s about getting better at the way the company works. Gone are most of the closed-off conference rooms and rows of cramped desks filled with employees crowding around each other’s workspaces to check out projects.

“One of the really important things we learned when working with our design firm, Gensler, is that people work in a lot of different ways,” Doud said. “You work by yourself, you work as a pair, you work in a team, you work in a group. So we had to figure out, how do we create the right environment so you have all of the destinations for how you work?”

The creative team works in what they call "organized chaos" at Planit.

The creative team works in what they call “organized chaos” at Planit. (Photo by LeAnne Matlach)

Now in addition to traditional desks, there are couches and tables for small groups, a large conference room and an almost movie theater-like setup for when clients come to visit.

Campaigns will no longer be unveiled around a conference room table. The new space is meant to make you feel like you’re in a friend’s home.

“So much of what we do is about storytelling and about building brands. This lends itself to more conversation instead of presentation,” Doud said. “With the best agency-client relationships you feel comfortable with each other, you trust each other. People sort of drop their shoulders and they feel more welcoming in an environment like this.”

Planit's new media room is meant to feel like a movie theater instead of a conference room.

Planit’s new media room is meant to feel like a movie theater instead of a conference room. (Photo by LeAnne Matlach)

The comfort will be extending to coffee service by the end of the summer when Planit opens a full-service coffee shop for the Locust Point neighborhood it inhabits.

“Part of why we chose this location was that we like this neighborhood, we want to be a part of the neighborhood.,” Doud said as he looked into the construction zone that will be the coffee shop. And the name of the cafe, Order and Chaos, is a nod to the two sides of the agency. The order of the accounts side and the organized chaos of the creative end of things.

For now the space is dust and exposed brick but Doud said the shop will serve coffee and also grab-and-go breakfast and lunch. Doud hopes Order and Chaos will serve the community.

The accounts team sits at ordered desks at Planit.

The accounts team sits at ordered desks at Planit. (Photo by LeAnne Matlach)

“I think there is a little bit of intrigue with the ad agency world if you’re not in it,” he said. “Mad Men was a whole TV show about it, so we wanted to give people some peek into what we’re doing.”

It will offer a chance to interact with consumers. But also: “It will be a perk for our employees and a perk for the neighborhood,” said Doud.

-30-
LeAnne Matlach

LeAnne Matlach is a freelance reporter in Baltimore. After more than five years bouncing around Delaware and Maryland as a TV and radio reporter, Matlach moved to Baltimore in 2014 and jumped headfirst into the Baltimore tech community. She's originally from New York but has shunned her "Lawn Guyland" accent.

Advertisement

Sign-up for regular updates from Technical.ly

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!