Learn about Philly's role in computing history at this PADLA conference - Technical.ly Philly

Sciences

Dec. 16, 2016 8:45 am

Learn about Philly’s role in computing history at this PADLA conference

The PA/DE/NJ Distance Learning Association is rallying over 20 exhibitors at their 14th annual conference.

Part of the ENIAC computer.

(Photo by Flickr user Terren in Virginia, under a Creative Commons license)

If you pine for the early days of computer science, there’s a conference happening next week at the University of the Sciences you won’t want to miss.

The PA/DE/NJ Distance Learning Association’s (PADLA) is hosting its 14th Annual Conference & Expo on Tuesday, Dec. 20 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., featuring a talk from technologist Bill Mauchly — son of ENIAC inventor John Mauchly and an OG technologist in his own right (remember his Ignite Philly talk?) — who will be interviewed by Jim Scherrer, founding director of Exton, Pa.’s Compuseum.

A following presentation session features researcher Mick Smith discussing “A Short History of Philadelphia Computer History: Why You Care ‘Moore.'”

“The Conference also features 25 concurrent education/training technology/methodology sessions, 20+ exhibitors, free food, free parking, prizes & an opportunity to network/collaborate with the PADLA professional community,” said Louis Stricoff, PADLA’s executive director, in an email.

Tickets for the conference are $50 and you can get them here. We also have two pairs of tickets to give away.

For a chance to win a ticket, sign up for our newsletter, which sends you a roundup of Technical.ly Philly’s headlines every day. When you sign up, use the code “ENIAC.” If you’re already getting our newsletter, sign up for our national newsletter for headlines from all across our Northeast markets, using the same code. Sign up by Sunday, Dec. 19. We’ll alert winners on Monday.

-30-
Roberto Torres

Roberto Torres became Technical.ly Lead Philly Reporter in May 2016. Prior, he was a freelance contributor to Technical.ly and Al Dia News. The native Venezuelan moved to Philadelphia in 2015 after reporting on research at his alma mater, the University of Zulia. Whenever he's not fencing deadlines, he can be found standing in line at Overbrook Pizza in West Philly, running Netflix/Hulu marathons with his wife or reading news from Venezuela.

Advertisement

Sign-up for regular updates from Technical.ly