Technical.ly Philly

Church&State:
Hack with Technical.ly at this media business hackathon, Sept. 26-28 @ WHYY

Sep. 28, 2012 8:30 am

Chief Innovation Officer Adel Ebeid wins White House’s ‘Champion of Change’ award [LINKS]

Philly 311 Turns Urban Complaints Into High-Tech Gossip [PhillyMag] Philly Post contributor Brian Howard runs down the most notable complaints on the city’s new Philly 311 app, saying, “Yes, yes, this is all very good from a government transparency perspective. But it’s even better for its voyeuristic qualities. [...] But mixed up in this very […]

Philly 311 Turns Urban Complaints Into High-Tech Gossip [PhillyMag] Philly Post contributor Brian Howard runs down the most notable complaints on the city’s new Philly 311 app, saying, “Yes, yes, this is all very good from a government transparency perspective. But it’s even better for its voyeuristic qualities. [...] But mixed up in this very utilitarian public service app is Philly’s own version of Passive Aggressive Notes, or a more productive channeling of the energy that goes into City Paper‘s I Love You, I Hate You.

White House Names Local ‘Champions of Change’ [Govtech] The city’s Chief Innovation Officer Adel Ebeid won this award and went to Washington, D.C. earlier in the week to accept it. He told Technically Philly that he accepted it on behalf of Philadelphia, even though it was awarded to him, because he couldn’t have won the award without the support of the city.

Philadelphia’s Katherine Gajewski is turning a gritty city green [Grist] Grist profiles the city’s sustainability director.

DN Editorial: Editorial: People’s Board says it’s time to reform taxes [Philadelphia Daily News] “We, the People’s Editorial Board, were shocked to learn that if you are a local small business, you could be more heavily taxed by the city of Philadelphia than big out-of-state companies. We should amend that: Many of us were shocked, but some of us, who actually own and operate small businesses in the city, were not completely surprised, since we have been paying those taxes for a while.”

Printing Evolves: An Inkjet for Living Tissue [Wall Street Journal] “In about a dozen major university and corporate laboratories, biomedical engineers are working on ways to print living human tissue, in the hope of one day producing personalized body parts and implants on demand.” The University of Pennsylvania has a lab working on this, and its director is quoted in the WSJ article.

New owners take over at Sunoco Philadelphia refinery [Philadelphia Inquirer] “[The] Carlyle [Group] will be responsible for operating the facility, the largest refinery on the East Coast. It says it is “reimagining” the plant as a regional energy hub that will rely upon growing production of Marcellus Shale natural gas to manufacture motor fuels, electricity and chemicals.”

Site Lets You Simulate a Facebook Hack, Goes Viral at PennApps [Time] The PennApps project also got coverage on The Next Web and Complex.

Inside the largest student-run hackathon: A breeding ground for tech talent [VentureBeat] VentureBeat covers PennApps.

Drexel University LeBow School of Business student Ryan Williams hosts ‘Business Casual,’ a monthly web series on the school, focusing in this episode on, yes, you guessed it, freshman move in day.

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Juliana Reyes

Juliana Reyes began as lead reporter at Technical.ly Philly in July 2012. Previously, she was a city services beat reporter for the Philadelphia Daily News, as part of a project called “It’s Our Money.” She is learning to drive, learning to bike (in the city) but is an expert at taking SEPTA. She grew up in North Jersey and Manila, Philippines but she left the tropics for Bryn Mawr College, where she majored in linguistics. She now lives in West Philly.

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