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Mar. 5, 2014 10:15 am

Hopkins team clears preliminary round for $10M prize in wearable health tech

Team Aezon, a group of 15 undergraduate engineering students at the Johns Hopkins University, is one step closer to $10 million: it's one of 30 teams to have cleared the preliminary round in the global Tricorder XPRIZE competition.

The first component of Team Aezon's device is a portable unit that reads disposable test cartridges. Photo courtesy of Team Aezon via the HUB.

Team Aezon, a group of 15 undergraduate engineering students at the Johns Hopkins University, is one step closer to $10 million.

Aezon is one of 30 teams to have cleared the preliminary round in the global Tricorder XPRIZE competition sponsored by mobile conglomerate Qualcomm. The challenge calls on health IT entrepreneurs to create a real-life version of the fictional tricorder medical scanner popularized by the sci-fi show “Star Trek.” The real-life scanner has to be able to diagnose 15 different conditions and diseases.

The Hopkins students that make up the Aezon team say their device can do that, according to the HUB:

What the Hopkins students at Aezon have created is a mobile device they say can diagnose 15 different health conditions—including strep throat, pneumonia, mononucleosis, urinary tract infections, and even HIV—based on your vital signs and other data.

Aezon’s system is made of three components, including a “Vitals Monitoring Unit” currently being designed and produced by the health IT startup Aegle, one of nine startups in the inaugural DreamIt Health Baltimore accelerator.

As Technical.ly Baltimore reported, Aegle’s contribution to Aezon’s Tricorder XPRIZE entry is a wearable biometrics device that wraps around users’ necks and can track heart rate, respiratory rate, core body temperature and several other biometric readings.

Read more about Team Aezon -30-
Andrew Zaleski

Andrew Zaleski is a freelance journalist in Philadelphia and the former lead reporter for Technical.ly Baltimore. Before moving to Philadelphia in June 2014, he was a contributing writer to Baltimore City Paper and a Tech Check commentator for WYPR 88.1 FM, Baltimore city’s National Public Radio affiliate. He has written for The Atlantic, Outside, Richmond magazine, Washington City Paper, Baltimore magazine, Baltimore Style magazine, Next City, Grist.org, The Atlantic Cities, and elsewhere.

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