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Jan. 23, 2014 9:15 am

Digit All Systems the only GED test center in Baltimore city and county

Lance Lucas, founder of Digit All Systems.

In December 2013, Digit All Systems administered the GED — or General Educational Development — test to 894 people.

This isn’t necessarily to GED testers’ benefit, as Baltimore City Paper reports. The problem ultimately lies in a partnership that made GED testing a for-profit business, one that would shift the test from being an exam that could be taken via computer or with pencil and paper to an assessment available only in computerized form:

In March 2011, the nonprofit GED Testing Service of the American Council on Education (ACE) partnered with Pearson, the publishing giant and the world’s largest administrator of high-stakes electronic tests. The nonprofit ACE had been operating the GED test for more than 60 years with little change, but Pearson—which first got involved with ACE as a contractor conducting a study about paper-based versus computer-based testing—had big plans: phase out the paper-based test, create a new, computer-only test, and increase the per-test price from $45 to $120.

On the final day of 2013, Digit All Systems — whose computer training programs Technical.ly Baltimore covered in three parts in 2012 — claimed it was the only GED testing center open in the U.S.

Today, in 2014, it’s now the only center in Baltimore city and Baltimore County that offers the new, online-only GED test.

Read the full story at the Baltimore City Paper.

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