Changing the color of a 3D-printed acronym with Python and Raspberry Pi - Technical.ly Baltimore

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Jan. 21, 2014 10:15 am

Changing the color of a 3D-printed acronym with Python and Raspberry Pi

A clever hack by two Digital Harbor Foundation students was on display last week during the one-year anniversary of the Digital Harbor Tech Center.

From left: Glory Barongozi and Birendra Rai.

A clever hack by two Digital Harbor Foundation (DHF) students was on display last week during the one-year anniversary of the Digital Harbor Tech Center.

Two DHF youth members Birendra Rai and Glory Barongozi, using Python programming language and a Raspberry Pi (a computer the size of a credit card that can be used in a variety of DIY electronics projects), came up with a way to change the color on the inside of a wired-up, 3D model of DHF, as seen below:

DHFlogoDuring Thursday night’s anniversary, as more than 150 people crammed into the Digital Harbor Tech Center in Federal Hill, any color tweeted out by someone that was also tagged #DHFcolor would automatically change the color of the 3D acronym. (The script the students wrote scraped Twitter for the hashtag, which then triggered the color-changing process.) Some colors — gold, for instance — wouldn’t work. But purple, blue and the green Technical.ly Baltimore tweeted were fair game.

raspberrypi

The Raspberry Pi mini-computer, on the left, attached to the electrical board that changed the color of the lights.

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Andrew Zaleski

Andrew Zaleski is a freelance journalist outside Washington, D.C. He's written for Wired, Backchannel, Popular Science, Fortune, the Washington Post Magazine, the Atlantic and elsewhere.

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