Business

Feb. 26, 2013 9:00 am

KoolSpan makes TrustChip, its hardware-based voice encryption service, available for iPhone

TrustChip, a mobile security product made by Bethesda-based KoolSpan, is now available for the iPhone. With the TrustChip installed, iPhone users are equipped with a piece of hardware that provides voice encryption. The chip itself fits into a “TrustSleeve,” which “acts as an adaptor between the TrustChip and the iPhone” and “contains a separate 1200 […]

TrustChip, a mobile security product made by Bethesda-based KoolSpan, is now available for the iPhone. With the TrustChip installed, iPhone users are equipped with a piece of hardware that provides voice encryption.

The chip itself fits into a “TrustSleeve,” which “acts as an adaptor between the TrustChip and the iPhone” and “contains a separate 1200 mAh battery pack” that provides between 12 to 13.5 hours of battery life, according to a KoolSpan press release.

Once iPhone users have the TrustChip installed, they’re able to place fully encrypted phone calls through KoolSpan’s TrustCall application. As more federal government employees work from home using their own laptops and mobile phones, there’s a growing need for easy-to-use security applications and devices. TrustChip, which “ensures that the phone is protected against attacks made on the host device, as well as across network connections,” is one such device in that marketplace.

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Andrew Zaleski

Andrew Zaleski is a freelance journalist in Philadelphia and the former lead reporter for Technical.ly Baltimore. Before moving to Philadelphia in June 2014, he was a contributing writer to Baltimore City Paper and a Tech Check commentator for WYPR 88.1 FM, Baltimore city’s National Public Radio affiliate. He has written for The Atlantic, Outside, Richmond magazine, Washington City Paper, Baltimore magazine, Baltimore Style magazine, Next City, Grist.org, The Atlantic Cities, and elsewhere.

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